islands you can buy right now

islands you can buy right now

Most of these idyllic spots cost less than the average Auckland house.

If you want to join the ranks of rich-listers like Richard Branson and Leonardo DiCaprio, then you need to get your own private island.

Luckily, there are many islands on the market for under US$1 million (NZ$1.43million), which means your dream of having a completely private holiday spot could become a reality. Prices vary greatly based on where they’re located, whether homes have already been built on the property, and how many acres are available.

WILD CANE KEY ISLAND

Wild Cane Key island.

Private Islands

Wild Cane Key island.

Wild Cane Key island, off the coast of Bastimento in Central America, is listed for US$360,000.

The island is a total of 3.4 acres with multiple building spots available on the land. It’s most easily accessed by helicopter.

THE SWAINS CAY ANDROS PRIVATE ISLAND

The Swains Cay Andros Private Island

Private Islands

The Swains Cay Andros Private Island

The Swains Cay Andros Private Island is in the Bahamas and offers a two-bedroom, two-bathroom bungalow on its 2.2 acres of land.

It’s going for US$525,000.

NUKUDRAU ISLAND

Nukudrau Island.

Private Islands

Nukudrau Island.

Nukudrau Island is part of Fiji. The 46 acres of land are surrounded by clear waters ideal for snorkelling, diving, and fishing.

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Price is available upon request.

LOVANGO CAY

Lovango Cay.

Private Islands

Lovango Cay.

Lovango Cay is a five-acre island within the US Virgin Islands, and it’s just a 10-minute helicopter ride away from St. Thomas’ Cyril E. King Airport.

Price is available upon request.

CAYO IGUANA

Cayo Iguana island.

Private Islands

Cayo Iguana island.

Cayo Iguana is a private island off the coast of Nicaragua.

The five-acre island is listed for US$750,000 and includes a large three-bedroom, two-bathroom house.

THE MAVUVA ISLAND LOTS 

The Mavuva Island Lots.

Private Islands

The Mavuva Island Lots.

The Mavuva Island Lots are located on a 42-acre island in Fiji.

The lots run between US$75,000 and US$125,000.

FRIGATE CAYE

Frigate Caye.

Private Islands

Frigate Caye.

Enjoy fishing, snorkelling, kayaking, kite-sailing, and scuba diving off the coast of this 1.4-acre island near Belize.

It’s currently listed for US$225,000.

ALEUTKINA ISLAND.

Aleutkina Island.

Private Islands

Aleutkina Island.

For US$297,000, you can purchase this 1.81-acre island off the coast of Alaska.

On it are several potential building sites and places to build a dock. It’s perfect for those who love to fish for shrimp, crab, and clam.

DEADMAN CAYE

Deadman Caye.

Private Islands

Deadman Caye.

The 1.4-acre Deadman Caye, located off the coast of Belize, is guarded from the waves by the surrounding coral reef.

Here you’ll have access to some of the best spots for bone fishing, and it’s on the market for $299,000.

TAHIFEHIFA ISLAND

Tahifehifa Island.

Private Islands

Tahifehifa Island.

Tahifehifa Island is near the island group of Tonga in the South Pacific.

At 1.09 acres, this island is listed for US$311,623, and it has a beautiful white-sand beach.

EAST SISTER ROCK ISLAND

East Sister Rock Island.

Private Islands

East Sister Rock Island.

If you’re looking to splurge a bit more, consider the US$11.5 million East Sister Rock Island. Located in the Florida Keys, this island features a three-bed, two-bath home, plus a guesthouse and a helicopter launch pad.

Pink Pearl Island is 2.5 acres of land off the coast of Nicaragua. On the market for $500,000, this island’s listing includes a house in the middle of the island.

Business Insider

Pink Pearl Island costs just US$500,000.

Private Islands

Pink Pearl Island costs just US$500,000.

Published at Mon, 19 Dec 2016 01:24:53 +0000

Salvage operation for sunken fishing vessel at Ahuriri

Salvage operation for sunken fishing vessel at Ahuriri

MOP UP: From left Simon Moffitt and Mike Alebardi from the Hawke's Bay Regional Council lay down specialised paper to absorb the diesel oil from the sunken boat. PHOTO/PAUL TAYLOR
MOP UP: From left Simon Moffitt and Mike Alebardi from the Hawke’s Bay Regional Council lay down specialised paper to absorb the diesel oil from the sunken boat. PHOTO/PAUL TAYLOR

A salvage operation is currently underway for a recreational fishing vessel that sunk overnight.

A crane is in place and efforts are currently concentrated on containing the diesel aboard the boat that has been brought to the Iron Pot at Ahuriri, Napier.

Divers are preparing to assist with the vessel that was brought down from Coromandel last week by its new owner.

More to come.

- Hawkes Bay Today

Published at Sun, 18 Dec 2016 20:56:18 +0000

Future of Fisheries meeting tomorrow

Future of Fisheries meeting tomorrow

A FUTURE of Fisheries meeting tomorrow evening will address proposed changes to the fishing industry, including new rules on discarding fish and the use of cameras and electronic monitoring.

The meeting was originally scheduled for last Tuesday but was postponed due to the power cut.

The meeting is one of 15 around the country on the programme, which the Ministry for Primary Industries says is about getting the maximum value from New Zealand’s fisheries by getting better information and improving decision- making processes.

Feedback from the meetings and hui will be analysed, along with formal submissions.

A FUTURE of Fisheries meeting tomorrow evening will address proposed changes to the fishing industry, including new rules on discarding fish and the use of cameras and electronic monitoring.

The meeting was originally scheduled for last Tuesday but was postponed due to the power cut.

The meeting is one of 15 around the country on the programme, which the Ministry for Primary Industries says is about getting the maximum value from New Zealand’s fisheries by getting better information and improving decision- making processes.

Feedback from the meetings and hui will be analysed, along with formal submissions.

Published at Sun, 18 Dec 2016 22:29:34 +0000

No keeping Noel off the water

No keeping Noel off the water

You may wonder why at age 75 Noel Haszard just can’t keep off the water. But there’s a logical explanation. He caught the boating bug early.

“My father took me fishing when I was five. And his father took him before him too,” says Noel, who has been on the water for the last 70 years.

“My grandfather used to be an engineer surveyor in Waihi but he had a little bivvy out here [Tanners Point] – oh, it must just after the start of this century, the early-1900s. So my father used to come out here as a kid, and later on he had holidays here,” says Noel, who lives at Tanners Point.

“My dad took me fishing and all of us boys have been keen on the water over the years. We were brought up in boats – all sorts of boats. But in the early days it was an old clinker we had.”

Now Noel’s clocked up his 21st year with the Bay of Plenty Regional Council – including 19 spent as a volunteer safer boating advisor, educating boaties from Omokoroa to Waihi Beach on how to be safe on the water.

So how did this start?

Noel had lived in Waihi for 50 years working as an electrician before moving to Tanners Point with wife Maureen about 22 years ago.

“When I first got here [Tanners Point] there was chap called Tim Suckling, who was a launch warden – that’s what they called a harbour warden in those days. And he said: ‘Do you want to give me hand?”.

“I ended up starting in an education role. And it still is I suppose, come to think of it.”

When Noel first started helping out it was from his own vessel and using his own petrol.

“Back then we used to fly a harbour master flag when we were patrolling. These days we are paired up with others, work from dedicated patrol vessels and are really well trained and equipped. We do a much better job as a result.

“Our area ranges from Omokoroa right up to the top of Athenree – and about 12 miles out to sea. But we don’t go out to sea very often.”

Noel says today’s boaties are far more safety-conscious than they were two decades ago.

“There was a scant regard for lifejackets back in those days,” says Noel, who reckons the common attitude was ‘she’ll be right mate’.

“Whereas now we take boating safety quite seriously. For example, last year when I was doing my patrols lifejacket compliance was nearly 100 per cent.”

“It doesn’t mean to all were wearing them – but they had them in the vessels. I didn’t ever think we would win that battle but we are. There is an increasing number wearing them too.”

Noel, who has also been part of Waihi Beach Volunteer Coastguard for the last 16 years, says people’s attitudes have changed too.

“The change is for the better. We [harbour patrollers] used to be looked upon as the enemy, but now people are pleased to see us on the water doing our job.

“What it boils down to is education. All the signs, channel markers and communications the council has organised to help educate folk about how to be safe on the water appears to be sinking in. There has been a remarkable turnaround.”

And is there a standout fact people don’t realise about being safe on the water? “I think the thing is thing can go wrong so quickly,” says Noel.

“For example, a wave on the entrance of Tauranga Harbour can swamp your boat and put water into the front of your boat within three or four seconds.

“But in the harbour the key is to keep your lookout – and even the wake from a large boat will tip a little dinghy over.”

And there’s many sea kayakers around too these days that boaties need to be aware of. “Kayaks are very vulnerable in the water.”

Noel is still on the patrol roster – and with summer approaching a busy season is ahead – educating boaties to keep safe.

“Things will start warming up a few weeks before Christmas – and go right to Easter.”

And it still stuns Noel how many people go boating these days. “We’ve noticed a lot of families go boating these days.” Compared to 20 years ago just being dad going out to catch a feed. “Now, it’s family affair.”

If you are a qualified skipper or experienced boatie and want more information on what a harbour warden or safer boating advisor does and how to become one, call Daniel Rapson at BOPRC on 0800 884 880.

Published at Sun, 18 Dec 2016 21:47:32 +0000

Struggle no longer: The alternative Christmas gift list is here

Struggle no longer: The alternative Christmas gift list is here

Emoji coin purse is a bit of a "gag gift" idea this Christmas.

Emoji coin purse is a bit of a “gag gift” idea this Christmas.

Choosing Christmas presents for those hard-to-buy-for people adds unwanted stress to an already stressful time of year.

You’ve bought for the kids, and for your mum and dad, but what about the people who seem to have everything, or don’t want or need anything?

How about fishing drones, or emoji purses, or a 3D pen?

Bonsai is a Japanese art form of growing miniature trees in shallow pots.

JASON OXENHAM/FAIRFAX NZ

Bonsai is a Japanese art form of growing miniature trees in shallow pots.

Trade Me spokesman Logan Mudge​ said while drones’ popularity dropped from the highs they enjoyed in 2015, they were seeing interest in the latest evolution – the fishing drone.

READ MORE:
Top 10 must-have toys for Christmas this year
Hatchimals flying off the shelves in lead up to Christmas, worldwide shortage causes stock issues

“I’m a big fan of the fishing drone I could have a lot of fun with that.”

Fishing drone allows you to pull single baits out to spots that cannot be reached by casting.

Fishing drone allows you to pull single baits out to spots that cannot be reached by casting.

A fishing drone allows you to pull single baits out to spots that cannot be reached by casting, and can even replace traditional kontiki systems by flying out multiple baited hooks to offshore locations.

However, a drone won’t cut it for everyone.

“The laser cut brooch is a great gift for Grandma – a bit of new tech applied to an old fashion favourite,” Mudge said.

Scratch maps feature a top foil surface that allows you to create a visual travel record.

Scratch maps feature a top foil surface that allows you to create a visual travel record.

“For your uncle, I think the silicon record coasters are a great touch. He can reminisce about music in his heyday while keeping the water mark from his beer off the table.”

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There had been spikes in Trade Me searches of a number of alternative Christmas gifts.

“In particular, fishing drones have seen a 120 per cent jump in searches since the start of December, 3D pens are pretty new but we’ve seen some big jumps in searches (up 80 per cent since the start of December), while bonsais are really popular all year long so searches have only increased by 5 per cent since the start of the month.

Bring drawings to life with a 3D printer pen.

Bring drawings to life with a 3D printer pen.

“We expect to see searches and sales increase as we get closer to the day and ‘present panic’ sets in.”

There is also a Go Pro lifejacket, which – if you are taking selfies in the water this summer – will help you keep hold of your Go Pro in the waves.

There there’s chocolate or cinnamon beard oil. You could give this to the man in your life who is still rocking the Movember look.

Go Pro lifejacket help you keep hold of your Go Pro in the waves.

Go Pro lifejacket help you keep hold of your Go Pro in the waves.

Mudge admitted there were a few of the gifts that were a “little out of the ordinary”, he said.

For the traveller – or aspiring traveller – there’s a scratch globe. Yep, a scratch globe. Coins at the ready.



A bit of 21st century technology creating mum and nana's favourite fashion style accessory.

A bit of 21st century technology creating mum and nana’s favourite fashion style accessory.

For the trickster in the family comes a modern day “gag gift” – an emoji coin purse.

“There’s someone in every family who deserves or needs this,” Mudge said.

Mudge wanted to remind keen shoppers to get in quickly, as there was just seven sleeps until the big day.

Trade Me’s top 10 gifts for those hard-to-by-for people

  • Fishing Drone 
  • Go Pro lifejacket
  • Bonsai 
  • Chocolate Beard Oil
  • Silicone Record Coasters
  • Scratch maps
  • Emoji coin purse
  • Novelty tea infusers
  • Laser cut wooden brooches
  • 3D printing pen

 – Stuff

Published at Sat, 17 Dec 2016 16:00:44 +0000

Hooking the limelight

Hooking the limelight

Judith Forbes reflects on a day fishing with her brothers and cousins.

We set off from the crib, armed with rods, lures and a polystyrene chilly bin, and walked along the dunes towards the mouth of the Taieri River. The heady scent of lupins and gorse in full bloom filled the air, and the marram grass brushed against our legs until we were out on the open beach. I had to run to keep up with the boys, but was proud that they had agreed to take me fishing with them.

That year, the river had gouged a deep channel on the southern side, with a sandbar visible through the middle reaches. My cousins and brothers all cast their lines well across into the middle of the river, where the shallower water was catching the light, sending millions of tiny reflections back to the sky. Trying to follow their example, I cast mine. It can’t have gone more than 5m, but at least it was in the water.

The tip of my rod dipped suddenly — it gave me such a fright. I squealed and jumped, and the boys looked at me in disgust! But the pull on my line was undeniable. I held on tight and tried to remember what they had told me. Hold it firmly, then slowly turn the handle on the reel. One of my cousins was watching, and came to help as I tried to keep my balance.

I was all fingers and thumbs with the rod held only half-steady between my knees and left hand, while trying to turn the little handle with my right hand. Eventually I sorted out my co-ordination enough to reel in my first fish, a gleaming kahawai! I turned away in horror while my eldest cousin detached it from the hook, and bled it on to the sand.

“Beginner’s luck,” the boys stated, matter-of-factly, as they looked at my fish, then went back to their own rods.

I cast again, no further than before.

Good fortune was running my way, and again my line was jerked taut by an invisible force somewhere in that deep channel.

Within about 20 minutes, I had caught four large kahawai. The experienced fisher-boys with me caught none, their perfect casts overshooting the running fish by several metres every time. Eventually, our hunger overcame the pleasure (or pain) of the morning, and we walked home for lunch in silence.

The earth had shifted slightly on its axis, the weak become strong. The natural order of things turned upside down.

And Mum’s fish pie had never tasted better!

– Judith Forbes is the principal of Bayfield High School, in Dunedin.

Your best day

Tell us about your best day. Send submissions to odt.features@odt.co.nz. We ask that you don’t nominate the day you were married or when a child arrived. But any other day is fine.

Published at Sun, 18 Dec 2016 17:09:07 +0000

Struggle no longer: The alternative Christmas gift list is here

Struggle no longer: The alternative Christmas gift list is here

Emoji coin purse is a bit of a “gag gift” idea this Christmas.

Choosing Christmas presents for those hard-to-buy-for people adds unwanted stress to an already stressful time of year.

You’ve bought for the kids, and for your mum and dad, but what about the people who seem to have everything, or don’t want or need anything?

How about fishing drones, or emoji purses, or a 3D pen?

Trade Me spokesman Logan Mudge​ said while drones’ popularity dropped from the highs they enjoyed in 2015, they were seeing interest in the latest evolution – the fishing drone.

READ MORE:
Top 10 must-have toys for Christmas this year
Hatchimals flying off the shelves in lead up to Christmas, worldwide shortage causes stock issues

“I’m a big fan of the fishing drone I could have a lot of fun with that.”

A fishing drone allows you to pull single baits out to spots that cannot be reached by casting, and can even replace traditional kontiki systems by flying out multiple baited hooks to offshore locations.

However, a drone won’t cut it for everyone.

“The laser cut brooch is a great gift for Grandma – a bit of new tech applied to an old fashion favourite,” Mudge said.

“For your uncle, I think the silicon record coasters are a great touch. He can reminisce about music in his heyday while keeping the water mark from his beer off the table.”

There had been spikes in Trade Me searches of a number of alternative Christmas gifts.

“In particular, fishing drones have seen a 120 per cent jump in searches since the start of December, 3D pens are pretty new but we’ve seen some big jumps in searches (up 80 per cent since the start of December), while bonsais are really popular all year long so searches have only increased by 5 per cent since the start of the month.

“We expect to see searches and sales increase as we get closer to the day and ‘present panic’ sets in.”

There is also a Go Pro lifejacket, which – if you are taking selfies in the water this summer – will help you keep hold of your Go Pro in the waves.

There there’s chocolate or cinnamon beard oil. You could give this to the man in your life who is still rocking the Movember look.

Mudge admitted there were a few of the gifts that were a “little out of the ordinary”, he said.

For the traveller – or aspiring traveller – there’s a scratch globe. Yep, a scratch globe. Coins at the ready.



For the trickster in the family comes a modern day “gag gift” – an emoji coin purse.

“There’s someone in every family who deserves or needs this,” Mudge said.

Mudge wanted to remind keen shoppers to get in quickly, as there was just seven sleeps until the big day.

Trade Me’s top 10 gifts for those hard-to-by-for people

  • Fishing Drone 
  • Go Pro lifejacket
  • Bonsai 
  • Chocolate Beard Oil
  • Silicone Record Coasters
  • Scratch maps
  • Emoji coin purse
  • Novelty tea infusers
  • Laser cut wooden brooches
  • 3D printing pen

– Stuff

Comments

Published at Sat, 17 Dec 2016 16:09:39 +0000