Shoalhaven Open Tournament 2017

Shoalhaven Open Tournament 2017

We are Jervis Bay Game Fishing Club. Jervis Bay is located just south of Nowra, on the south coast of New South Wales. The pristine waters in & around Jervis Bay and surrounding areas are host to all major Game & Sport fish, such as Blue, Black & Striped Marlin, Dolphin fish, Yellowtail Kingfish, and several Tuna species including Yellowfin.

Our club is affiliated Game Fishing Clubs within N.S.W. We are affiliated with the Australian Game Fishing Association and the N.S.W. Game Fishing Association.
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Eden Open Tournament 2017

Eden Open Tournament 2017

The club also strongly supports the NSW fisheries Tag and Release (T&R) program with more than half of our club and tournament prizes being awarded based on points for T&R fish.

Throughout its history, the ES&GFC has repeatedly recorded catches of various fish species including Yellow and Blue fin Tuna, Thresher and Mako Sharks, Broadbill and Short bill Spearfish and Marlin. As a club affiliated with both the Game Fishing Association Australia (GFAA) and the Australian National Sportfish Association (ANSA) we hold several past and present Australian and NSW GFA records for fish caught in our surrounding waters.

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Broken Bay Invitatinal 2017

Broken Bay Invitatinal 2017

The Port Hacking Game Fishing Club is one of the oldest and longest running game fishing clubs in NSW waters and has strong affiliations with the NSWGFA, GFAA, IGFA. Many of our members past and present hold a range of NSW, Australian and World records.

The club operates out of the Royal Motor Yacht Club Port Hacking and boasts first class marina, boating and weigh station facilities. We have a strong following with well over a 120 financial members and some 30 plus boats ranging in size from 19’ – 60’ foot. During the fishing season club point score days are held twice a month over the weekends with members being able to elect either Saturday or Sunday to fish.

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Zane Grey Tournament 2017

Zane Grey Tournament 2017

Bay Of Islands Swordfish Club

Game fishing by rod and reel was first started by a few enthusiasts at the turn of the century. In February 1915, Major A.D. Campbell caught the first ever marlin on rod and reel in the Bay of Islands. It was during the mid-1920s that Zane Grey, the American writer and fisherman came to the Bay of Islands and the Bay became famous as a game fishing.

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Concession works as intended

Concession works as intended

With regard to Keith Ingram’s recent reply to Gordon Halley’s opinion on CRA3 . . . Keith’s view on the so-called lack of legal crayfish in and around the Gisborne region is nothing short of fabricated propaganda and is based mainly on comments from a very small number of fishers who don’t know how to catch them. Also, there is no science to back up the claims of recreational not being able to take home 54mm fish. Well, none that I have read.

My own data shows that using only three pots, I have caught 293 fish from 73 pot lifts since mid-November — which is 4.01 fish per pot. Contained within this data is that for the first week I fished within easy reach of people in small dinghies, 135 fish from 23 pot lifts for 5.8 fish/pot. This is pretty much what I am told also for what those fishing within close proximity of Gisborne were getting.

Since the introduction of the 52mm concession I have witnessed a dramatic increase in not only fish in the pots, but also numbers of legal fish at 54mm.

Not all Gisborne people want the concession removed. The problem with science is that it sometimes doesn’t reflect what is actually happening out there.

The CRA3 concession is doing exactly what I feel it was designed to do — to create abundance. I’m sure people think abundance is about how much legal fish they can take, which is not true. Abundance is about how much fish are actually in the sea. I can tell you that there is a healthy abundance of all sizes of crayfish.

My belief is that with the cray fishermen taking concession-sized fish during the winter period of June, July and August (no females), they are then out of the water for the rest of the year and do not look to be back in it until around January 15 at the earliest. More importantly, they are not fishing when recreational demand is at its highest.

Now, should the concession be removed I can tell you that the cray boys would go back to fishing 24/7, 365 days of the year — meaning we would be back to spatial conflict once again, which has also been one of the aggravating issues here.

Does it really matter whether or not there is a differing size limit? Many parts of the country have different size and bag limits for certain other species for recreational, yet no one complains about this.

The recreational sector needs to realise that all our fisheries are shared and, although we may not get all we desire as recreational, it is about being able to compromise — which is how I see the CRA3 area. I would rather have commercial fish three to four months of the year than all 12 months.

Keith comments that his advocacy is for 32 individuals, groups and clubs and that it is their mandate he speaks on behalf of. I would be interested to know just who he speaks for. Keith also states that commercial fishers up the coast don’t land 52mm fish during winter — this is incorrect, Mahia is the only area that doesn’t land 52mm but this is a voluntary agreement between fishers down there.

Lastly, what no one wishes to acknowledge let alone do anything about is the amount of poaching carried out in the Gisborne region, which amounts to around 89 tonnes — as it’s in the too-hard basket. Advocacy groups and individuals find it much easier to blame MPI or commercial than look at themselves.

With regard to Keith Ingram’s recent reply to Gordon Halley’s opinion on CRA3 . . . Keith’s view on the so-called lack of legal crayfish in and around the Gisborne region is nothing short of fabricated propaganda and is based mainly on comments from a very small number of fishers who don’t know how to catch them. Also, there is no science to back up the claims of recreational not being able to take home 54mm fish. Well, none that I have read.

My own data shows that using only three pots, I have caught 293 fish from 73 pot lifts since mid-November — which is 4.01 fish per pot. Contained within this data is that for the first week I fished within easy reach of people in small dinghies, 135 fish from 23 pot lifts for 5.8 fish/pot. This is pretty much what I am told also for what those fishing within close proximity of Gisborne were getting.

Since the introduction of the 52mm concession I have witnessed a dramatic increase in not only fish in the pots, but also numbers of legal fish at 54mm.

Not all Gisborne people want the concession removed. The problem with science is that it sometimes doesn’t reflect what is actually happening out there.

The CRA3 concession is doing exactly what I feel it was designed to do — to create abundance. I’m sure people think abundance is about how much legal fish they can take, which is not true. Abundance is about how much fish are actually in the sea. I can tell you that there is a healthy abundance of all sizes of crayfish.

My belief is that with the cray fishermen taking concession-sized fish during the winter period of June, July and August (no females), they are then out of the water for the rest of the year and do not look to be back in it until around January 15 at the earliest. More importantly, they are not fishing when recreational demand is at its highest.

Now, should the concession be removed I can tell you that the cray boys would go back to fishing 24/7, 365 days of the year — meaning we would be back to spatial conflict once again, which has also been one of the aggravating issues here.

Does it really matter whether or not there is a differing size limit? Many parts of the country have different size and bag limits for certain other species for recreational, yet no one complains about this.

The recreational sector needs to realise that all our fisheries are shared and, although we may not get all we desire as recreational, it is about being able to compromise — which is how I see the CRA3 area. I would rather have commercial fish three to four months of the year than all 12 months.

Keith comments that his advocacy is for 32 individuals, groups and clubs and that it is their mandate he speaks on behalf of. I would be interested to know just who he speaks for. Keith also states that commercial fishers up the coast don’t land 52mm fish during winter — this is incorrect, Mahia is the only area that doesn’t land 52mm but this is a voluntary agreement between fishers down there.

Lastly, what no one wishes to acknowledge let alone do anything about is the amount of poaching carried out in the Gisborne region, which amounts to around 89 tonnes — as it’s in the too-hard basket. Advocacy groups and individuals find it much easier to blame MPI or commercial than look at themselves.

(Why?)

Published at Tue, 28 Feb 2017 22:42:07 +0000

Concession works as intended

Concession works as intended

With regard to Keith Ingram’s recent reply to Gordon Halley’s opinion on CRA3 . . . Keith’s view on the so-called lack of legal crayfish in and around the Gisborne region is nothing short of fabricated propaganda and is based mainly on comments from a very small number of fishers who don’t know how to catch them. Also, there is no science to back up the claims of recreational not being able to take home 54mm fish. Well, none that I have read.

My own data shows that using only three pots, I have caught 293 fish from 73 pot lifts since mid-November — which is 4.01 fish per pot. Contained within this data is that for the first week I fished within easy reach of people in small dinghies, 135 fish from 23 pot lifts for 5.8 fish/pot. This is pretty much what I am told also for what those fishing within close proximity of Gisborne were getting.

Since the introduction of the 52mm concession I have witnessed a dramatic increase in not only fish in the pots, but also numbers of legal fish at 54mm.

Not all Gisborne people want the concession removed. The problem with science is that it sometimes doesn’t reflect what is actually happening out there.

The CRA3 concession is doing exactly what I feel it was designed to do — to create abundance. I’m sure people think abundance is about how much legal fish they can take, which is not true. Abundance is about how much fish are actually in the sea. I can tell you that there is a healthy abundance of all sizes of crayfish.

My belief is that with the cray fishermen taking concession-sized fish during the winter period of June, July and August (no females), they are then out of the water for the rest of the year and do not look to be back in it until around January 15 at the earliest. More importantly, they are not fishing when recreational demand is at its highest.

Now, should the concession be removed I can tell you that the cray boys would go back to fishing 24/7, 365 days of the year — meaning we would be back to spatial conflict once again, which has also been one of the aggravating issues here.

Does it really matter whether or not there is a differing size limit? Many parts of the country have different size and bag limits for certain other species for recreational, yet no one complains about this.

The recreational sector needs to realise that all our fisheries are shared and, although we may not get all we desire as recreational, it is about being able to compromise — which is how I see the CRA3 area. I would rather have commercial fish three to four months of the year than all 12 months.

Keith comments that his advocacy is for 32 individuals, groups and clubs and that it is their mandate he speaks on behalf of. I would be interested to know just who he speaks for. Keith also states that commercial fishers up the coast don’t land 52mm fish during winter — this is incorrect, Mahia is the only area that doesn’t land 52mm but this is a voluntary agreement between fishers down there.

Lastly, what no one wishes to acknowledge let alone do anything about is the amount of poaching carried out in the Gisborne region, which amounts to around 89 tonnes — as it’s in the too-hard basket. Advocacy groups and individuals find it much easier to blame MPI or commercial than look at themselves.

With regard to Keith Ingram’s recent reply to Gordon Halley’s opinion on CRA3 . . . Keith’s view on the so-called lack of legal crayfish in and around the Gisborne region is nothing short of fabricated propaganda and is based mainly on comments from a very small number of fishers who don’t know how to catch them. Also, there is no science to back up the claims of recreational not being able to take home 54mm fish. Well, none that I have read.

My own data shows that using only three pots, I have caught 293 fish from 73 pot lifts since mid-November — which is 4.01 fish per pot. Contained within this data is that for the first week I fished within easy reach of people in small dinghies, 135 fish from 23 pot lifts for 5.8 fish/pot. This is pretty much what I am told also for what those fishing within close proximity of Gisborne were getting.

Since the introduction of the 52mm concession I have witnessed a dramatic increase in not only fish in the pots, but also numbers of legal fish at 54mm.

Not all Gisborne people want the concession removed. The problem with science is that it sometimes doesn’t reflect what is actually happening out there.

The CRA3 concession is doing exactly what I feel it was designed to do — to create abundance. I’m sure people think abundance is about how much legal fish they can take, which is not true. Abundance is about how much fish are actually in the sea. I can tell you that there is a healthy abundance of all sizes of crayfish.

My belief is that with the cray fishermen taking concession-sized fish during the winter period of June, July and August (no females), they are then out of the water for the rest of the year and do not look to be back in it until around January 15 at the earliest. More importantly, they are not fishing when recreational demand is at its highest.

Now, should the concession be removed I can tell you that the cray boys would go back to fishing 24/7, 365 days of the year — meaning we would be back to spatial conflict once again, which has also been one of the aggravating issues here.

Does it really matter whether or not there is a differing size limit? Many parts of the country have different size and bag limits for certain other species for recreational, yet no one complains about this.

The recreational sector needs to realise that all our fisheries are shared and, although we may not get all we desire as recreational, it is about being able to compromise — which is how I see the CRA3 area. I would rather have commercial fish three to four months of the year than all 12 months.

Keith comments that his advocacy is for 32 individuals, groups and clubs and that it is their mandate he speaks on behalf of. I would be interested to know just who he speaks for. Keith also states that commercial fishers up the coast don’t land 52mm fish during winter — this is incorrect, Mahia is the only area that doesn’t land 52mm but this is a voluntary agreement between fishers down there.

Lastly, what no one wishes to acknowledge let alone do anything about is the amount of poaching carried out in the Gisborne region, which amounts to around 89 tonnes — as it’s in the too-hard basket. Advocacy groups and individuals find it much easier to blame MPI or commercial than look at themselves.

(Why?)

Published at Tue, 28 Feb 2017 22:42:07 +0000

Powerbase Tournament 2017

Powerbase Tournament 2017

Bay Of Islands Swordfish Club

Iin 1952, the Club name was shortened to The Bay of Islands Swordfish Club Inc and that is how it stands today. Game fishing by rod and reel was first started by a few enthusiasts at the turn of the century. In February 1915, Major A.D. Campbell caught the first ever marlin on rod and reel in the Bay of Islands. It was during the mid-1920s that Zane Grey, the American writer and fisherman came to the Bay of Islands and the Bay became famous as a game fishing destination through his book “Tales of the Angler’s El Dorado”.

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Search for missing elderly man, daughter fishing off Firth of Thames

Search for missing elderly man, daughter fishing off Firth of Thames

A Coastguard plane is undertaking a search for a missing pair in a small fiberglass boat.

A Coastguard plane is undertaking a search for a missing pair in a small fiberglass boat.

A search is under way for a man and his daughter who failed to return from a fishing trip. 

The 73-year-old man and his 46-year-old daughter set off for a day-long trip on the western side of the Firth of Thames, north of Miranda, at 10.30am on Friday.

When they failed to return home as planned on Friday evening, the man’s wife reported the pair missing, Senior Sergeant Ray Malcolmson said. 

Their vehicle and boat trailer remain parked in the carpark at the Kaiaua boat ramp, where the pair launched the boat, he said. 

They were on board the Sledgehammer, a 4-metre fibreglass boat outfitted with an outboard motor. 

There are lifejackets on board, Malcolmson said, but the pair are not believed to have a cellphone or a radio. 

“Coastguard have a plane up looking for them. There are a large number of boats out today and many have been informed.”

Malcolmson said the man is a regular fisherman. There was no information about whether the pair had headed somewhere else or decided to spend the night out. 

Anyone out on the water who may have seen the boat is asked to contact 111 or phone Waikato Police on 07 858 6200. 


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Published at Fri, 24 Feb 2017 19:53:14 +0000